Showing posts with label 1930's. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1930's. Show all posts

Tuesday, 28 March 2017

Architecture Tart Tuesday: London and Canterbury:

Today I shall take you to Canterbury and London.

All photos taken by me.

First, Canterbury.





Debenhams.



Next, London.
One of my favourites! Battersea Power Station.


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Imperial War Museum, formally Bethlem Hospital.


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Millbank


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I'm guessing MI5.


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And this is MI6.


Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Architecture Tart Tuesday: Hampshire and London

Back with more architecture!

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Portsmouth has many of these little 1930's style buildings.
They are usually to be found on industrial estates.



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London's Royal Opera House.
The building is often referred to as simply "Covent Garden", after a previous use of the site of the opera house's original construction in 1732.



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A pretty little village by the name of East Meon.
It is such a quintessentially English place.




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The birthplace of cricket, at Hambledon in Hampshire.


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St Huberts at Idsworth in Hampshire.
984 years old this year!



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Steep Hangers in Hampshire



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The pretty little town of Emsworth in Hampshire, bordering West Sussex,  is littered with lovely architecture.
Another of those industrial type buildings.








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Which is your favourite?


Tuesday, 28 February 2017

Architecture Tart Tuesday: Portsmouth and Chichester

Portsmouth anyone?

All photos taken by me.

When I was a child, I really loved this building.
It used to be a British Telecoms building, but I have no idea what it is now.



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Catholic Church


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Hayling Island
This building I believe is modern.



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Sweet art deco house.
I took this years ago but may have recently bumped into the owners!




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How about we move on to Chichester?

I am convinced this now demolished building used to be a cinema.


Don't these doors just scream cinema to you?




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Chichester law Courts.
Well alright! The scene of the famous Rolling Stones trial in the 1960's.







Which is your favourite?

Tuesday, 13 December 2016

Architecture Tart Tuesday: Art Deco Worthing

(all photos taken by me)

When I was a child, I had a recurring dream about a cinema.
Imagine how shocked I was to visit Worthing for the very first time and to peer through the closed doors into the foyer where we would see Phantom of the Opera that night, to see it was the cinema of my dreams. Of my dreams in both senses of the word!

It was extended from the 1914 Picturedrome Cinema and opened as a theatre in 1935, it's expansion being done in the streamline modern style..
After struggling, it closed in 1966, reopening again in 1967.
It closed twice more temporarily, and reopened with projection facilities in 1972 and continues to this day.

These photos were taken on my birthday a few years back. It was a glorious day.

As I stepped back to admire the Connaught, I accidentally stepped back into the road. Thankfully it was a quiet side road, but that didn't stop a cyclist having to swerve to avoid hitting me. Oops.











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This building is just along the road from the Connaught.


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Worthing Pier.
A most beautiful place.

Wikipedia has this to say:
Worthing Pier is a pier in Worthing, West Sussex, England. Designed by Sir Robert Rawlinson, it was opened on 12 April 1862 and remains open. The pier originally was a simple promenade deck 960 ft (291m) long and 15 ft (4.6m) wide. In 1888 the pier was upgraded with the width increased to 30 ft (9.2m) and the pier head increased to 105 ft (32m) for a 650-seat pavilion to be built. It is a Grade II listed building.
The first moving picture show in Worthing was seen on the pier on 31 August 1896 and is commemorated today by a blue plaque. In 1897 a steam ship began operation between Worthing Pier and the Chain Pier in Brighton, twelve miles to the east.
In March 1913, on Easter Monday, the pier was damaged in a storm, with only the southern end remaining, completely cut off from land. Later, it was affectionately named 'Easter Island'. A rebuilt pier was opened on 29 May 1914.
In September 1933 the pier and all but the northern pavilion were destroyed by fire. In 1935 the remodelled Streamline Moderne pier was opened, and it is this that remains today.











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Worthing Rowing Club


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Apartment building.
Ordinarily I would say flats but there's something about this sort of architecture which begs to be described as an apartment building in my opinion.


I'm sure you can see why Worthing is one of my most favourite places in all of Great Britain.

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Which is your favourite?