Thursday, 16 February 2017

National Treasures: Hinton Ampner



Our third National Trust jaunt took us to a place we pass frequently, Hinton Ampner. As with the previous two properties, much of the actual house was closed off for cleaning, but in the case of Hinton Ampner, they allowed visitors into the entrance hall with a few examples of how things were looked after and cleaned.

Hinton Ampner, near Alresford, Hampshire, SO24 0LA







The house is relatively small compared to most stately homes and is set within some very pretty gardens with a small and very charming church.







Mistletoe was absolutely everywhere, I suppose it was in this abundance as it's on private land.





There were ornamental features ...


... and statues.
Go Greased Lightnin', you're burning up the quarter mile
(Greased Lightnin', go Greased Lightnin')
Go Greased Lightnin', you're coasting through the heat lap trial
(Greased Lightnin', go Greased Lightnin')


Shadows



and cottages



Aren't these yew hedges incredible! Andy doesn't like them, but I find them fascinating.





I loved all the frost ...





... and these seed heads reminded me of Emperor Tamarins.



And look, I even managed to find a flamingo!



Hinton Ampner House is a stately home with gardens within the civil parish of Bramdean and Hinton Ampner, near Alresford, Hampshire, England.



The garden was created by Ralph Stawell Dutton (1898–1985), the 8th and last Baron Sherborne, starting in 1930, making this a modern 20th-century garden. The property is now more noted for its garden than the house. Previously, the parkland came directly up to the house, which was designed to be a hunting lodge.



An earlier Tudor house stood close to the current site, before the current house was built. It was this house that attained notoriety in the 18th century, after it became uninhabitable due to a severe haunting. The tenant, one Mary Ricketts, wrote extensively on the subject for her children's benefit, after having been literally forced to flee the property with a few remaining retainers (many had already left in terror). The house was pulled down in 1793, after its replacement had been built about 50 meters (160 feet) to the south.



The current house was built in 1790 but remodelled extensively in 1867. It was remodelled again in the Neo-Georgian style by Trenwith Wills and Lord Gerald Wellesley for Ralph Dutton between 1936 and 1939 to his vision of what it would have been like had it been built on its current scale in 1790 – a Georgian country house. It was badly damaged by fire in 1960, and restored again much as it had appeared in 1936.



The house contains a number of fine paintings. There is a set of paintings of the four seasons by Jacob de Wit, depicting cherubs painted in a three-dimensional monochrome style.

Ralph Dutton, with no direct heirs, gave the estate to the National Trust, on his death in 1985.

12 comments:

  1. I love a good lion statue, and that is a very good lion statue that you've captured.

    Dod the ghosts go when the old gouse was pulled down? I presume they must have done!

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    1. Sweet isn't it!
      I like to think the ghosts just moved themselves into the new place, "Try and get rid of us, would you?" xxx

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  2. So many wonderful NT places to visit!! I'll add this one to the list.

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  3. Wow! That's one impressive hallway. How interesting to see how the antiquities are looked after, too.
    The gardens are wonderful, that spectacular topiary and the all the thoughtfully quirky bits of art scattered about. I bet you can't wait to go back in the Spring! xxx

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    1. Isn't it just, though I prefer the one we saw in the next house we visited 😊

      The gardens were so pretty, just a shame we missed a whole chunk of them as I didn't know that they were there and Andy failed to tell me about them and he had the map! xxx

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  4. What a lovely property and I love it when there is a church in the grounds. That yew hedge is spectacular! I love the spooky shadows photo, the scarecrow wearing a holly tie and seedheads lighted up by the winter sun. They might have put that flamingo there in your honour! xxx

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    1. Me too, I love a nose about in a church.

      Yes, I like to think they knew I was coming, hence the flamingo but I do think they could have lowered the price for me as it was about £125! xxx

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  5. The yew bushes are Amazing....and slightly unnerving! I love the stained glass windows in the church AND of course, your flamingo!!

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    1. They really are and I see why they unsettle people! I knew you'd appreciate the stained glass xxx

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  6. Those wavy hedges kind of make my skin crawl! LOL

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    1. That's because they're alive πŸ˜‰

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